Author: Ericsson

What does UDP mean?

UDP

UDP explained

UDP stands for User Datagram Protocol, and it is a popular communications protocol that offers a high-speed solution. It is used for producing low-latency and loss tolerating connections between the different applications on the Internet.

User Datagram Protocol boosts the speed of the communication process by allowing the transfer of data before the receiver provides an agreement. For that reason, User Datagram Protocol is the preferred option for time-sensitive communications, such as Domain Name System (DNS) lookup, Voice over IP (VoIP), video or audio transmissions.

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4 great free DNS hosting providers

free DNS hosting

DNS hosting service is a must to have for a domain to exist. No matter the size and type of domain you are planning to build (a big e-shop or a blog), you need this infrastructure for the domain to be accessible to visitors.

Choosing a quality provider is essential because DNS hosting impacts other important factors. A good or bad service will boost or hinder the domain’s performance, uptime, security, and speed. And, of course, the experience of users while visiting it. 

Why get free DNS hosting?

When searching for a DNS hosting provider, you have the choice of paying for the service or getting it for free. Paid services include premium features and more possibilities. But currently, there are reliable and robust enough free services for hosting almost any type of domain. Some free DNS hosting providers offer you: Dynamic DNS, IPv4, and IPv6 support, one account multiple domains, support for a wide variety of DNS records, forward and reverse DNS zones support, customer support, etc.

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Tracert command explained

Tracert command

If you are a Windows user and you want to trace the route from your computer to a specific target, the easiest option is to use the tracert command. With just a simple text command, you will see the hops.

What is the Tracert command?

The Tracert command is a Windows command with CLI that you can access through the Command Prompt, or if you prefer the PowerShell too, and use it to trace the route to a target. You will see statistics about each hop that show the response time (it sents 3 packets), IP addresses of the hops, and their hostnames.

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What is Ping command, and how to use it?

What is Ping command

What is Ping command?

Ping command is a simple network utility tool. It has a command-line interface. You can write different commands and test various elements of your network – a computer on the network, the router, a particular domain, or IP address.
The ping command uses ICMP – Internet control message protocol. When you are performing a check, you need to set a target, and additionally, you can add options for the number of packets, continuous pinging, timeout limits, IPv4 or IPv6, and more.
You will get a response with additional statistics.
An ICMP request is a small packet of data that your computer will send to the target. The target should bounce it back and send an answer for each ping.
You can find the Ping command on Linux and macOS through the Terminal application, or on Windows, through the Command Prompt.
You should also be able to find it on Android or iOS/iPadOS through a third-party Terminal application. 

Ping command – examples, switches, and more!

How to use Ping command?

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CNAME record explained

CNAME record

The CNAME record is one of the first DNS records that you will read about when you are starting with DNS management. It has a very important task to do, showing the true domain name for the subdomains, making it really an essential DNS record. It saves time and makes it easier to manage the DNS.

CNAME explained completely

There are two parts in the CNAME’s name. C stands for canonical, and it wants to show which is the true domain name for the one that you are trying to resolve. The NAME is obvious. It stands for name, as in hostname.

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Reverse DNS and PTR record – everything you need to know

Reverse DNS

Reverse DNS is a key component of the configuration of your mail server. 

Not having Reverse DNS can mean not sending emails! Without well-configured Reverse DNS zone and PTR records, the rest of the email servers can’t check your domain’s IP address and discard your messages or throw them into the spam box.

Everything you need to know about Reverse DNS

A Reverse DNS is a service that provides Reverse DNS zones for your domain. The Reverse DNS zones serve to host PTR records that can be used for verification purposes, to check the IP addresses and if they lead to the correct hostnames.

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What is TCP?

TCP (Transmission Control Protocol)

Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) is a communication standard, one of the first internet protocols (TCP/IP). It is connection-oriented, for all kind of devices and applications to exchange messages through a particular network. 

Data is organized in a specific way by TCP to be transmitted between client and server. The purpose is to protect the data on their trip around the network from the sending to the delivery.

TCP is a very popular protocol in network communications. 

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DNS TXT record explained

DNS TXT record

There are a lot of DNS record types, at least 50 out there! One of them is called DNS TXT record, and it has a variety of purposes. Yes, it is one simple text record, but it is widely used, so let us explain the TXT record.

TXT record explained

TXT record is a DNS record type that has text information designed for external to the domain sources. The text could be written for people, so it would be easy to read, has enough information and logically organized, or made for computers, and has a more technical format.

Usually, you will see, inside the TXT record, a piece of general information about the domain and an additional part for a particular type of validation.

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What is Time To Live (TTL)?

Time To Live TTL

What is TTL?

Time To Live (TTL) sounds like a horror movie, but luckily it is not related to people. It is the value that shows how long the information should be kept in a particular device. There are many pieces of data that have their own TTL value. Here we will see DNS TTL and CDN TTL. 

When we are talking about DNS TTL, it is related to the time that the DNS resolvers must keep the DNS records in their cache. Each of the DNS records will have its TTL value. There are some with longer TTL because there is less chance that the value will change and others with shorter TTL value, where there are often changes. 

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